Plastic Surgery

Plastic Surgery

Coloured Atlas

Third Degree Burns

(Full Thickness)
Full thickness burn to dorsum of hand. Thrombosed vessels and underlying adipose tissue are clearly visible.

Third Degree Burns

Second Degree Burns

(Deep Partial Thickness)
Deep partial thickness burn to palm. The wound has a wet, variable appearance, with both pale and red areas

Second Degree Burns

First Degree Burns

(Superficial Partial Thickness)
Superficial partial thickness burn to forearm. Note the presence of unroofed blisters.

First Degree Burns

Keloid Scar No. 3

Keloid Scar (Courtesy of Dr. A. Freiberg)

Keloid Scar No. 3

Keloid Scar No. 2

Note the overgrowth of dense fibrous tissues extending beyond the borders of the original injury. (Courtesy of Dr. A. Freiberg)

Keloid Scar No. 2

Keloid Scar No. 1

Note the overgrowth of dense fibrous tissues extending beyond the borders of the original injury. (Courtesy of Dr. A. Freiberg)

Keloid Scar No. 1

Hypertrophic Scar

Note that hypertrophic scars are limited to the traumatized area and may regress spontaneously, unlike keloid scars. (Courtesy of Dr. A. Freiberg)

Hypertrophic Scar

Venous Stasis

Venous Stasis Ulcer (Courtesy of Dr. A. Freiberg)

Venous Stasis

Diabetic

Diabetic Foot Ulcer (Courtesy of Dr. A. Freiberg)

Diabetic

Arterial Ischemic

Arterial Ischemic Ulcer (Courtesy of Dr. A. Freiberg)

Arterial Ischemic